Open Access

The epidemiology and medical management of low back pain during ambulatory medical care visits in the United States

Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care20082:11

DOI: 10.1186/1750-4732-2-11

Received: 10 August 2008

Accepted: 24 November 2008

Published: 24 November 2008

Abstract

Background

Low back pain (LBP) is a common symptom.

Methods

Patient visits attributed to LBP in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) during 2003–2004 served as the basis for epidemiological analyses (n = 1539). The subset of patient visits in which LBP was the primary reason for seeking care (primary LBP patient visits) served as the basis for medical management analyses (n = 1042). National population estimates were derived using statistical weighting techniques.

Results

There were 61.7 million (SE, 4.0 million) LBP patient visits and 42.4 million (SE, 3.1 million) primary LBP patient visits. Only 55% of LBP patient visits were provided by primary care physicians. Age, geographic region, chronicity of symptoms, injury, type of physician provider, and physician specialty were associated with LBP patient visits. Age, injury, primary care physician status, type of physician provider, and shared physician care were associated with chronicity of LBP care. Osteopathic physicians were more likely than allopathic physicians to provide medical care during LBP patient visits (odds ratio [OR], 2.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75–3.92) and chronic LBP patient visits (OR, 4.39; 95% CI, 2.47–7.80). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and narcotic analgesics were ordered during 14.2 million (SE, 1.2 million) and 10.5 million (SE, 1.1 million) primary LBP patient visits, respectively. Drugs (OR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.13–0.62) and, specifically, NSAIDs (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.25–0.64) were ordered less often during chronic LBP patient visits compared with acute LBP patient visits. Overall, osteopathic physicians were less likely than allopathic physicians to order NSAIDs for LBP (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.24–0.76). Almost two million surgical procedures were ordered, scheduled, or performed during primary LBP patient visits.

Conclusion

The percentage of LBP visits provided by primary care physicians in the United States remains suboptimal. Medical management of LBP, particularly chronic LBP, appears to over-utilize surgery relative to more conservative measures such as patient counseling, non-narcotic analgesics, and other drug therapies. Osteopathic physicians are more likely to provide LBP care, and less likely to use NSAIDs during such visits, than their allopathic counterparts. In general, LBP medical management does not appear to be in accord with evidence-based guidelines.

Background

Back pain is a common symptom in industrialized nations that is responsible for substantial morbidity, impairment, and disability. Low back problems have been leading reasons for patient visits and health care costs despite measures to control access to services and contain costs [1]. Health care costs and productivity losses, most often associated with chronicity [2], may be in excess of $50 billion annually in the United States [3].

Back problems almost always consist of or co-exist with pain, including back-related leg pain or sciatica [4]. Although generically referred to as "back problems"[4] or "back pain," most cases involve the lower back. Low back pain (LBP) is defined as pain localized between the twelfth rib and the inferior gluteal folds, with or without leg pain [5]. Low back pain is often classified as acute when it lasts for less than 6 weeks, subacute when it lasts between 6 weeks and 3 months, and chronic when it persists for longer than 3 months [6]. The vast majority of LBP cases involve a non-specific etiology. Yellow flags (including individual, psychosocial, and occupational factors [7]) are prognostic factors for occurrence and chronicity of such non-specific LBP, whereas red flags are signs or symptoms that have come to be associated with specific pathological causes of LBP [5].

Historically, LBP has taken up a large part of primary care practice [8]. It has been the second leading cause of office visits to primary care physicians [9], and the most common reason for office visits to occupational medicine physicians, orthopedic surgeons, and neurosurgeons [4]. Allopathic family (general) medicine physicians, osteopathic physicians, chiropractors, orthopedic surgeons, and other specialists are the main providers of LBP care in the United States [10]. A variety of treatments for LBP have been introduced into clinical practice, including educational interventions, exercise, weight reduction, various classes of analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, behavioral therapy, physical therapy, spinal manipulation, other complementary and alternative therapies, and surgery [11, 12].

The purpose of this study was to elucidate the epidemiology and medical management of LBP during ambulatory medical care visits in the United States.

Methods

Overview of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey design

The concept of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) to collect data on medical care provided in physician offices in the United States was developed over 30 years ago [13]. Detailed documentation of the NAMCS instrument, methodology, and data files that served as the basis for this study is available elsewhere [14, 15]. Patient visits were selected using a multistage probability sample design. The first stage included primary sampling units (PSUs) which consisted of counties, groups of counties, county equivalents (e.g. parishes), towns, townships, minor civil divisions, or metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). These PSUs comprised a probability subsample of those used in the 1985–1994 National Health Interview Surveys [16]. The latter, which covered all 50 states and the District of Columbia, were stratified by demographic and socioeconomic variables and then selected with probability proportional to their size. Stratification was done within four geographic regions by MSA and non-MSA status.

The second stage consisted of a probability sample of practicing physicians selected from the master files of the American Medical Association (AMA) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA). Within each PSU, all eligible physicians were further stratified by specialty. The third stage involved selection of patient visits within the practices of participating physicians. Initially, physicians were randomly assigned to one of the 52 weeks within a calendar year. Then, a systematic random sample of patient visits was selected for each physician during the assigned week. The sampling rate of patient visits varied from a 20% sample for very large practices to 100% for very small practices as determined by a presurvey interview [17]. In this manner, data from about 30 patient visits were recorded by each physician during the assigned week.

Sampling frame and sample size

The sampling frame for NAMCS included physicians who met the criteria of being: (1) office-based; (2) principally engaged in patient care activities; (3) nonfederally employed; and (4) not in the specialties of anesthesiology, pathology, or radiology. During 2003 and 2004, a total of 6000 physicians were initially screened. Of these, 2032 (34%) did not meet the four inclusion criteria, most commonly because the physician was retired, deceased, or employed in teaching, research, or administration. Of the remaining 3968 eligible physicians, 2779 (70%) participated in NAMCS. However, among these "participating" physicians, 544 (20%) saw no patients during their assigned reporting period because of vacations, illness, or other reasons for being temporarily not in practice. The NAMCS provides data on 25,288 patient visits to 1114 physician offices during the 2003 calendar year and 25,286 patient visits to 1121 physician offices during the 2004 calendar year.

Patient visits and weights

The basic sampling unit for the NAMCS is the physician-patient encounter or "patient visit." The following types of contacts were excluded: telephone calls, visits outside the physician's office (e.g., house calls), visits made in hospital settings (unless the physician had a private office in a hospital), visits made in institutional settings that had primary responsibility for the patient's care (e.g., nursing homes), and visits to the physician's office for administrative purposes only (e.g., to leave a specimen, pay a bill, or pick up insurance forms). Each patient visit was assigned a weight based on four factors: (1) probability of being selected by the three-stage sampling design; (2) adjustment for nonresponse; (3) adjustment for physician specialty group; and (4) weight smoothing to minimize the impact of a few physician outliers whose final visit weights were large relative to those for the remaining physicians. Thus, by applying these weights to each of the 50,574 patient visits in the 2003 and 2004 NAMCS data files, an estimated 1.8 billion physician office visits in the United States were available to derive unbiased national estimates of ambulatory medical care services and to further characterize such services.

Data collection and processing

Data for the NAMCS were collected by the physician with assistance from office staff when possible. Patient record forms were used to collect the data for each selected visit. The NAMCS field staff performed completeness checks of the patient record forms prior to submission for central data processing. Detailed editing instructions were provided to reclassify or recode ambiguous or inconsistent data entries. Quality control measures, which were used to verify the accuracy of computer data entry, indicated that the mean keying error rate was 0.1% for nonmedical items and that discrepancy rates ranged from 0.0% to 1.1% for required medical items.

Item nonresponse rates were 5% or less for most variables. Major exceptions (nonresponse rate) included: ethnicity (20%), race (18%), tobacco use (30%), and time spent with physician (16%). Missing data for birth year (4%), sex (4%), race (18%), ethnicity (20%), and time spent with physician (16%) were imputed by assigning the value from a randomly selected patient record form representing another patient with similar known characteristics. Such imputations were performed according to physician specialty, geographic region (state was used instead of geographic region to impute ethnicity), and primary diagnosis codes.

Data management and statistical analyses

This study focused on patient visits for LBP. These were initially identified using the "reason for visit" (RFV) item of the NAMCS patient record form. Specifically, patient visits were included only if back symptoms (RFV classification code number, 1905) or low back symptoms (RFV classification code number, 1910) were reported as one of the three most important reasons for the visit in the patient's own words. Subsequently, any patient visits attributed to a lump, mass, or tumor of the back or low back were excluded. Exploratory analyses of the data stratified according to RFV classification code numbers (1905 vs. 1910) and importance of symptoms (primary reason for visit vs. secondary or tertiary reason for visit) revealed few substantive differences between groups. Consequently, to maximize statistical power, all epidemiological analyses combined RFV classification code numbers 1905 and 1910 to represent prevalent cases of LBP (i.e., back symptoms, other than those attributed to a lump, mass, or tumor, were the primary, secondary, or tertiary reason for the patient visit). However, only those patient visits in which LBP was the primary reason for seeking medical care ("primary LBP patient visits") were included in the medical management analyses to minimize potential confounding by other secondary or tertiary reasons for the patient visit. Patient visits attributed to neck symptoms (RFV classification code number, 1900) exclusive of LBP were not included in the study. National population estimates derived from the NAMCS may be unreliable if they are based on fewer than 30 unweighted patient visits or if the relative standard error (standard error divided by the national population estimate) is greater than 0.30 [14, 15].

Patient sociodemographic characteristics included age, sex, race, ethnicity, geographic region, and MSA status of residence. Patient visit context characteristics included episode of care, chronicity of symptoms, and whether the visit was related to an injury, poisoning, or adverse effect (IPA). Physician provider characteristics included primary care physician status, type of physician provider (Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathy), physician specialty, and whether multiple physicians shared responsibility for medical care of the patient. The elements of LBP medical management included any diagnostic tests, patient counseling, drugs, physiotherapy, or surgical procedures that were ordered, scheduled, or performed during the patient visit. Drugs were broadly defined as any medications or injections, including immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, or dietary supplements, that were ordered, supplied, administered, or continued during the visit, regardless of prescription or over-the-counter status. Up to eight drugs may have been listed on the NAMCS patient record form during a patient visit. For each drug listed, up to three therapeutic class codes were assigned based on the standard classifications used in the National Drug Code (NDC) Directory [18]. The drugs portion of this study focused exclusively on three common drugs for relief of pain (NDC code, 1700): (1) non-narcotic analgesics (NDC code, 1722); (2) narcotic analgesics (NDC code, 1721); and (3) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (NDC code, 1727), including antiarthritics (NDC code, 1724). To maintain consistency with the NDC codes used in the NAMCS patient record form, the term "narcotic analgesic" will be used herein rather than "opioid." Physiotherapy consisted of treatments using heat, light, sound, physical pressure, or movement, including manipulative therapy.

To study the epidemiology of LBP, national population estimates of patient visits were derived and stratified according to patient sociodemographic, patient visit context, and physician provider characteristics. Multiple logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with LBP patient visits compared with patient visits for all other reasons. Similar analyses were repeated according to chronicity of LBP: (1) initial visits for acute LBP and (2) follow-up visits for chronic LBP. To study the LBP medical management, national population estimates of the use of diagnostic tests, patient counseling, drugs, physiotherapy, and surgical procedures were derived for patient visits in which LBP was the primary reason for seeking medical care. Simple logistic regression was initially performed to compute crude ORs and 95% CIs for the elements of chronic LBP medical management compared with acute LBP medical management. Multiple logistic regression was subsequently used to compute adjusted ORs and 95% CIs for the most commonly used elements of LBP medical management. All hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of statistical significance.

The electronic files containing the 2003 and 2004 NAMCS data were acquired from the National Center for Health Statistics. The files were merged and analyzed using SPSS Version 14.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Because the multistage probability design of the NAMCS includes clustering, stratification, and the assignment of unequal probabilities of selection to sample units, all analyses were performed with the SPSS complex samples module to accurately compute estimates of population parameters and their standard errors [19]. A check of these statistical procedures, which involved the entire 2003 and 2004 NAMCS databases, verified that the computed marginal totals for national population estimates were identical to those published by the National Center for Health Statistics [14, 15].

Results

National population estimates of patient visits for low back pain

There were an estimated 31 million (3%) patient visits annually attributed to LBP in the United States. For the 2003–2004 period, 1539 patient record forms representing 61.7 million (SE, 4.0 million) LBP patient visits and 1042 patient record forms representing 42.4 million (SE, 3.1 million) primary LBP patient visits were included in the analyses reported herein (Figure 1). The physician specialties most commonly seen during LBP patient visits were family (general) medicine, 25.2 million (SE, 2.3 million); internal medicine, 14.4 million (SE, 3.0 million); and orthopedics, 5.6 million (SE, 0.9 million). In orthopedics, one of every 16 patient visits involved LBP (one of every 11 working-age patients seen for reasons other than preventive or surgery-related care). In family (general) medicine, one of every 17 patient visits involved LBP (one of every 13 working-age patients seen for reasons other than preventive or surgery-related care). Patient visits for LBP were attributed to the following factors: (1) back pain, ache, soreness, or discomfort, 94%; (2) other back symptoms, including cramps, contractures, spasms, limitation of movement or stiffness, or weakness, 2%; and (3) other unspecified back symptoms, 4%. Prior to combining LBP patient visits, they were originally designated as RFV classification code number 1905 in 39.0 million (SE, 2.7 million) patient visits and as RFV classification code number 1910 in 22.8 million (SE, 2.0 million) patient visits. A total of 42.4 million (SE, 3.1 million) patient visits (69%) involved LBP as the primary reason for seeking medical care.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1750-4732-2-11/MediaObjects/13026_2008_Article_25_Fig1_HTML.jpg
Figure 1

National population estimates of patient visits for low back pain in the United States, 2003–2004. LBP indicates low back pain; NPE, national population estimate; SE, standard error. National population estimates are for both years combined and were computed by applying patient visits weights to the numbers reported in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Patient visits involving back symptoms attributed to a lump, mass, or tumor are not included as LBP visits. Patient visits other than initial visits for acute problems or follow-up visits for chronic problems are not represented under the "all LBP visits" and "primary LBP visits" headings.

There were few differences in patient visit characteristics according to the importance of LBP (primary reason for seeking medical care vs. secondary or tertiary reasons for seeking medical care) or RFV classification code number (1905 vs. 1910) (Table 1). Neurologists were less likely than other physician specialties to provide care for primary LBP (P = .05). Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics (P = .02) and osteopathic physicians were more likely than allopathic physicians (P = .04) to involve RFV classification code number 1910 rather than 1905.
Table 1

Patient Visits for Low Back Pain According to Importance and Classification of Reason for Visit, 2003–2004 (N = 1,539)*

 

Importance of Reason for Visit

Reason for Visit Classification Code†

 

Primary

Secondary or Tertiary

1905

1910

Characteristic

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

Patient age, y

                

<25

73

2,828

420

7

42

1,595

316

8

81

3,257

430

8

34

1,167

274

5

25–44

340

14,052

1,194

33

133

5,308

553

28

289

11,598

1,091

30

184

7,763

666

34

45–64

392

16,122

1,796

38

206

7,476

934

39

364

14,192

1,279

36

234

9,406

1,432

41

≥ 65

237

9,424

1,118

22

126

4,910

620

25

249

9,918

1,209

25

114

4,417

655

19

Patient sex

                

Female

589

24,275

1,941

57

319

12,377

875

64

582

23,178

1,852

59

326

13,474

1,074

59

Male

453

18,152

1,716

43

188

6,913

749

36

401

15,786

1,312

41

240

9,279

1,277

41

Patient race

                

White

936

37,791

2,951

89

439

16,567

1,140

86

870

33,905

2,480

87

505

20,453

1,815

90

Non-White

106

4,635

637

11

68

2,724

604

14

113

5,059

924

13

61

2,300

366

10

Patient ethnicity

                

Non-Hispanic

943

38,746

3,055

91

458

17,455

1,155

90

903

36,011

2,604

92

498

20,189

1,821

89

Hispanic

99

3,681

509

9

49

1,836

378

10

80

2,953

484

8

68

2,563

395

11

Geographic region

                

Northeast

292

13,189

2,211

31

149

5,376

760

28

253

10,157

1,582

26

188

8,408

1,689

37

Midwest

222

8,102

1,146

19

107

3,602

400

19

216

7,966

1,170

20

113

3,739

447

16

South

313

11,984

1,319

28

146

5,964

607

31

315

12,592

1,411

32

144

5,356

558

24

West

215

9,152

1,313

22

105

4,348

580

23

199

8,249

1,090

21

121

5,250

683

23

MSA status

                

MSA

861

36,579

3,208

86

432

17,125

1,344

89

815

33,342

2,882

86

478

20,362

2,034

89

Non-MSA

181

5,848

1,653

14

75

2,166

599

11

168

5,623

1,497

14

88

2,391

652

11

Episode of care

                

Initial

351

14,286

1,126

34

158

6,210

614

32

322

13,279

1,093

34

187

7,217

743

32

Follow-up

617

24,754

2,483

58

304

10,893

1,011

56

586

22,309

1,962

57

335

13,338

1,699

59

Other or missing

74

3,387

545

8

45

2,188

373

11

75

3,376

543

9

44

2,198

371

10

Chronicity of symptoms

                

Acute

402

16,819

1,260

40

169

6,632

685

34

360

14,820

1,292

38

211

8,631

712

38

Chronic, routine

398

16,797

2,342

40

211

7,096

845

37

380

14,874

1,685

38

229

9,019

1,603

40

Chronic, flare-up

176

6,494

779

15

79

2,990

404

15

171

6,280

724

16

84

3,203

513

14

Other or missing‡

66

2,317

402

5

48

2,573

471

13

72

2,990

388

8

42

1,900

340

8

IPA etiology

                

No

722

28,796

2,161

68

341

13,215

1,006

69

698

27,443

2,195

70

365

14,568

1,201

64

Yes

320

13,631

1,449

32

166

6,075

716

31

285

11,522

1,040

30

201

8,185

1,100

36

PCP status

                

Non-PCP or unknown

589

18,744

2,306

44

314

9,241

918

48

532

16,465

1,940

42

371

11,519

1,564

51

PCP

453

23,683

1,845

56

193

10,049

958

52

451

22,499

1,823

58

195

11,233

934

49

Type of physician

                

Doctor of Medicine

782

31,845

2,192

75

407

15,399

1,080

80

762

30,832

2,257

79

427

16,412

1,132

72

Doctor of Osteopathy

260

10,582

2,130

25

100

3,892

600

20

221

8,132

1,434

21

139

6,341

1,631

28

Physician specialty

                

Family (general) medicine

404

18,523

1,737

44

145

6,687

692

35

382

17,484

1,879

45

167

7,725

1,011

34

Internal medicine

107

9,702

2,264

23

54

4,703

1,008

24

96

8,199

1,257

21

65

6,206§

2,234

27

Neurology

141

1,244

218

3

96

1,011

213

5

132

1,138

181

3

105

1,116

322

5

Orthopedics

151

3,618

546

9

66

2,020

489

10

121

3,025

478

8

96

2,613

505

11

All other specialties

239

9,340

1,278

22

146

4,869

586

25

252

9,118

1,160

23

133

5,092

697

22

Shared physician care

                

No or unknown

715

31,694

2,633

75

336

13,417

1,007

70

690

28,951

2,184

74

361

16,160

1,692

71

Yes

327

10,733

1,017

25

171

5,873

672

30

293

10,013

963

26

205

6,593

703

29

Total

1,042

42,427

3,108

100

507

19,290

1,201

100

983

38,964

2,655

100

566

22,753

1,957

100

Abbreviations: IPA, injury, poisoning, or adverse effect of medical treatment; MSA, metropolitan statistical area; NPE, national population estimate for the two-year interval; PCP, primary care physician, SE, standard error of the national population estimate.

*Table entries for NPE and SE are in thousands; percentages are based on NPE.

†1905 represents back pain and 1910 represents low back pain.

‡Other options included pre- or post-surgery visits, prenatal care, and health maintenance visits.

§NPE may be unreliable because SE>30% of NPE.

The epidemiology of ambulatory medical care visits for low back pain

Patient visits for LBP predominantly involved persons aged 25 to 64 years (69%) and females (59%) (Table 2). A majority of patient visits were for follow-up care. Patient visits were about evenly divided between acute and routine chronic LBP, and about one-third of visits were attributed to an IPA. Among the estimated 8.4 million patient visits in which an IPA was specified, 7.4 million (88%) involved injuries (primarily overuse syndromes, motor vehicle accidents, or falls) and 0.9 million (11%) involved adverse effects of surgical procedures, drugs, or environmental agents. Thus, IPAs served as a useful surrogate for injuries. Only slightly more than half (55%) of the patient visits were provided by primary care physicians.
Table 2

Patient Visits According to Presence or Absence of Low Back Pain, 2003–2004 (N = 50,558)*

 

LBP Status

    
 

LBP Present

LBP Absent

LBP Visits

Primary LBP Visits†

Characteristic

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

OR‡

95% CI

OR‡

95% CI

Patient age, y

            

<25

115

4,423

572

7

10,764

431,753

24,165

25

0.30

0.22 0.41

0.26

0.18 – 0.38

25–44

473

19,360

1,410

31

10,212

378,110

19,956

22

1.00

...

1.00

...

45–64

598

23,599

2,409

38

14,426

497,737

25,996

28

0.84

0.71 – 1.00

0.78

0.65 – 0.95

≥ 65

363

14,335

1,443

23

13,607

447,079

23,110

25

0.60

0.47 – 0.75

0.54

0.41 – 0.70

Patient sex

            

Female

908

36,652

2,539

59

27,581

1,035,915

46,027

59

1.00

...

1.00

...

Male

641

25,065

2,042

41

21,428

718,765

32,578

41

0.93

0.81 – 1.06

1.01

0.85 – 1.20

Patient race

            

White

1,375

54,358

3,825

88

42,716

1,497,330

71,034

85

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-White

174

7,359

1,015

12

6,293

257,349

16,925

15

0.88

0.68 – 1.14

0.80

0.61 – 1.06

Patient ethnicity

            

Non-Hispanic

1,401

56,201

3,846

91

44,432

1,565,163

68,318

89

1.00

...

1.00

...

Hispanic

148

5,516

676

9

4,577

189,516

22,488

11

1.02

0.81 – 1.29

1.01

0.76 – 1.34

Geographic region

            

Northeast

441

18,566

2,856

30

10,111

340,535

31,296

19

1.00

...

1.00

...

Midwest

329

11,704

1,608

19

11,056

367,864

38,458

21

0.56

0.40 – 0.77

0.53

0.37 – 0.75

South

459

17,948

1,584

29

17,262

674,752

49,514

38

0.56

0.40 – 0.77

0.52

0.36 – 0.75

West

320

13,499

1,630

22

10,580

371,528

29,742

21

0.75

0.52 – 1.07

0.71

0.48 – 1.06

MSA status

            

MSA

1,293

53,704

4,318

87

42,768

1,534,434

99,888

87

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-MSA

256

8,013

2,093

13

6,241

220,245

51,084

13

1.00

0.78 – 1.28

1.06

0.79 – 1.43

Episode of care

            

Initial

509

20,495

1,431

33

14,004

526,779

23,102

30

1.00

...

1.00

...

Follow-up

921

35,647

3,256

58

26,324

829,669

41,893

47

0.98

0.83 – 1.16

1.02

0.83 – 1.26

Other or missing

119

5,575

706

9

8,681

398,231

23,040

23

0.80

0.56 – 1.14

0.88

0.57 – 1.36

Chronicity of symptoms

            

Acute

571

23,451

1,602

38

15,741

615,627

25,898

35

1.00

...

1.00

...

Chronic, routine

609

23,893

2,932

39

17,885

561,484

30,854

32

1.37

1.08 – 1.74

1.36

1.03 – 1.79

Chronic, flare-up

255

9,483

985

15

4,493

139,324

9,200

8

2.09

1.65 – 2.65

2.03

1.58 – 2.63

Other or missing§

114

4,890

618

8

10,890

438,244

24,905

25

0.52

0.35 – 0.77

0.33

0.20 – 0.56

IPA etiology

            

No

1,063

42,011

2,824

68

43,823

1,569,266

68,357

89

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

486

19,707

1,785

32

5,186

185,413

10,269

11

3.38

2.75 – 4.14

3.33

2.64 – 4.21

PCP status

            

Non-PCP or unknown

903

27,985

2,959

45

33,809

925,652

54,734

53

1.00

...

1.00

...

PCP

646

33,732

2,345

55

15,200

829,027

38,795

47

0.84

0.61 – 1.16

0.82

0.55 – 1.21

Type of physician

            

Doctor of Medicine

1,189

47,244

2,859

77

45,316

1,636,480

72,120

93

1.00

...

1.00

...

Doctor of Osteopathy

360

14,474

2,718

23

3,693

118,199

12,647

7

2.61

1.75 – 3.92

2.68

1.77 – 4.06

Physician specialty

            

Family (general) medicine

549

25,210

2,259

41

8,240

405,563

26,625

23

3.28

2.26 – 4.77

3.59

2.26 – 5.72

Internal medicine

161

14,405

3,074

23

3,044

273,218

23,834

16

3.34

2.11 – 5.27

3.38

1.95 – 5.85

Neurology

237

2,255

405

4

3,202

25,403

2,685

1

3.97

2.69 – 5.85

3.25

2.07 – 5.08

Orthopedics

217

5,638

896

9

2,521

82,010

9,469

5

2.27

1.48 – 3.49

2.19

1.35 – 3.53

All other specialties

385

14,209

1,688

23

32,002

968,485

49,844

55

1.00

...

1.00

...

Shared physician care

            

No or unknown

1,051

45,111

3,282

73

35,679

1,339,868

60,278

76

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

498

16,606

1,413

27

13,330

414,812

22,483

24

1.17

0.99 – 1.39

1.09

0.88 – 1.35

Total

1,549

61,717

3,988

100

49,009

1,754,679

76,123

100

 

...

 

...

Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; IPA, injury, poisoning, or adverse effect of medical treatment; LBP, low back pain; MSA, metropolitan statistical area; NPE, national population estimate for the two-year interval; OR, odds ratio; PCP, primary care physician, SE, standard error of the national population estimate.

*Table entries for NPE and SE are in thousands; percentages are based on NPE.

†Includes only patient visits in which LBP was the primary reason for seeking medical care (n = 1042).

‡Adjusted for all variables shown.

§Other options included pre- or post-surgery visits, prenatal care, and health maintenance visits.

When compared with the 1.8 billion (SE, 7.6 million) patient visits for reasons other than back symptoms, LBP visits were associated with several factors (Table 2). Low back pain was less likely the reason for a patient visit in all younger and older age categories compared with the referent category (25–44 years) (P < .001). There was a geographic variation in patient visits attributed to LBP (P = .001), with fewer visits in the Midwest and South than in the Northeast. Patient visits for LBP were more likely to reflect chronicity of symptoms, either routine ongoing problems or flare-ups, than were patient visits for other reasons (P < .001). However, injuries, as reflected by the surrogate IPA item, were important predictors of LBP patient visits (P < .001). The type of physician provider (P < .001) and physician specialty (P < .001) were associated with LBP patient visits, with osteopathic physicians, family (general) medicine physicians, internal medicine physicians, neurologists, and orthopedic surgeons being more likely to provide medical care during such visits. Similar findings were observed when the analyses involved only primary LBP patient visits rather than all LBP patient visits.

A total of 15.8 million (SE, 1.0 million) LBP patient visits were initial visits for an acute problem (less than three months since onset) and 27.4 million (SE, 2.8 million) LBP patient visits were follow-up visits for chronic LBP (Table 3). Age <25 years (P < .001), injury (P < .001), and being seen by a primary care physician (P = .01) were inversely associated with LBP chronicity, whereas being seen by an osteopathic physician (P < .001) and shared physician care (P = .003) were directly associated with LBP chronicity. Again, similar findings were observed when the analyses involved only primary LBP patient visits rather than all LBP patient visits.
Table 3

Patient Visits for Low Back Pain According to Chronicity, 2003–2004 (n = 1,062)*

 

Chronicity

    
 

Acute Problem

(Initial Visit)

Chronic Problem

(Follow-Up Visit)

Chronic Problem Visits

Primary Chronic Problem Visits†

Characteristic

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

OR‡

95% CI

OR‡

95% CI

Patient age, y

            

<25

49

2,012

287

13

26

836§

197

3

0.27

0.13-0.55

0.20

0.09-0.45

25–44

112

5,351

565

34

195

7,920

907

29

1.00

...

1.00

...

45–64

123

5,157

597

33

287

11,025

1,867

40

1.27

0.84-1.93

1.24

0.81-1.91

≥ 65

80

3,237

542

21

190

7,585

1,110

28

1.42

0.84-2.40

1.29

0.66-2.50

Patient sex

            

Female

218

9,242

757

59

400

15,815

1,684

58

1.00

...

1.00

...

Male

146

6,515

775

41

298

11,551

1,463

42

1.17

0.79-1.73

1.22

0.81-1.85

Patient race

            

White

329

13,955

966

89

619

24,498

2,821

90

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-White

35

1,802

404

11

79

2,867

554

10

1.03

0.60-1.76

0.85

0.45-1.60

Patient ethnicity

            

Non-Hispanic

326

14,164

984

90

642

25,299

2,718

92

1.00

...

1.00

...

Hispanic

38

1,593

334

10

56

2,066

386

8

0.74

0.42-1.32

0.86

0.41-1.77

Geographic region

            

Northeast

91

3,494

363

22

211

9,671

2,386

35

1.00

...

1.00

...

Midwest

76

3,189

495

20

133

3,918

452

14

0.65

0.40-1.08

0.66

0.33-1.32

South

131

5,775

670

37

201

7,569

848

28

0.86

0.52-1.40

0.90

0.51-1.61

West

66

3,299

460

21

153

6,207

1,214

23

1.23

0.62-2.46

1.03

0.45-2.38

MSA status

            

MSA

307

13,706

1,113

87

588

24,113

2,917

88

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-MSA

57

2,050

572

13

110

3,252

973

12

1.16

0.67-1.99

1.05

0.58-1.92

IPA etiology

            

No

224

9,611

860

61

518

20,345

1,874

74

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

140

6,146

586

39

180

7,020

1,350

26

0.46

0.31-0.67

0.49

0.32-0.75

PCP status

            

Non-PCP or unknown

170

4,733

518

30

437

13,841

2,151

51

1.00

...

1.00

...

PCP

194

11,024

963

70

261

13,524

1,366

49

0.45

0.26-0.79

0.48

0.25-0.90

Type of physician

            

Doctor of Medicine

299

13,656

932

87

497

18,256

1,623

67

1.00

...

1.00

 

Doctor of Osteopathy

65

2,101

285

13

201

9,109

2,402

33

4.39

2.47-7.80

4.08

2.26-7.36

Physician specialty

            

Family (general) medicine

163

7,990

768

51

227

10,248

1,341

37

0.58

0.31-1.07

0.64

0.31-1.32

Internal medicine

42

3,611

560

23

80

7162§

2,603

26

0.97

0.48-1.95

0.98

0.40-2.39

Neurology

36

287

63

2

129

1,283

262

5

1.41

0.67-2.94

0.91

0.34-2.45

Orthopedics

44

1,064

166

7

81

2,279

407

8

0.89

0.48-1.65

1.17

0.50-2.73

All other specialties

79

2,804

372

18

181

6,394

1,096

23

1.00

...

1.00

...

Shared physician care

            

No or unknown

283

13,096

1,008

83

448

19,240

2,565

70

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

81

2,661

401

17

250

8,125

960

30

2.11

1.30-3.44

2.15

1.18-3.93

Total

364

15,757

1,018

100

698

27,365

2,844

100

 

...

 

...

Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; IPA, injury, poisoning, or adverse effect of medical treatment; MSA, metropolitan statistical area; NPE, national population estimate for the two-year interval; OR, odds ratio; PCP, primary care physician, SE, standard error of the national population estimate.

*Table entries for NPE and SE are in thousands; percentages are based on NPE.

†Includes only patient visits in which low back pain was the primary reason for seeking medical care (n = 710).

‡Adjusted for all variables shown.

§NPE may be unreliable because n<30 or SE>30% of NPE.

The medical management of primary low back pain during ambulatory medical care visits

Overall, a majority of primary LBP patient visits included diagnostic tests (89%), patient counseling (53%), and orders for drugs (72%) (Figures 2, 3, 4, respectively). Compared with patient visits in which LBP was absent, primary LBP patient visits were more likely to involve patient counseling (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17–2.04) and physiotherapy (OR, 7.89; 95% CI, 6.01–10.35); however, they were less likely to involve surgical procedures (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.38–0.83). There were no significant differences in the frequency of diagnostic tests performed or drugs ordered. The most common elements of LBP medical management included radiographs (13%), exercise counseling (20%), NSAIDs (34%), narcotic analgesics (25%), and physiotherapy (20%). There were 14.2 million (SE, 1.2 million) and 10.5 million (SE, 1.1 million) orders, respectively, for NSAIDs and narcotic analgesics during these primary LBP patient visits (Table 4). Except for the variables "exercise counseling," "any patient counseling," "narcotic analgesics," "NSAIDs," and "any drug ordered," the elements of primary LBP medical management were not reported in sufficiently high numbers of patient visits to provide statistically valid and reliable comparisons of initial visits for acute LBP and follow-up visits for chronic LBP. Drugs generally (P = .002), and NSAIDs specifically (P < .001), were ordered less often during follow-up visits for chronic LBP than during initial visits for acute LBP. Similarly, diagnostic tests were generally performed less often during follow-up visits for chronic LBP than during initial visits for acute LBP (P = .003). However, surgical procedures were ordered more often during follow-up visits for chronic LBP than during initial visits for acute LBP (P < .001).
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1750-4732-2-11/MediaObjects/13026_2008_Article_25_Fig2_HTML.jpg
Figure 2

Diagnostic tests in the medical management of primary low back pain in the United States, 2003–2004. Other imaging tests are exclusive of mammograms.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1750-4732-2-11/MediaObjects/13026_2008_Article_25_Fig3_HTML.jpg
Figure 3

Patient counseling in the medical management of primary low back pain in the United States, 2003–2004. Mental health counseling also includes stress management and psychotherapy.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1750-4732-2-11/MediaObjects/13026_2008_Article_25_Fig4_HTML.jpg
Figure 4

Drugs ordered in the medical management of primary low back pain in the United States, 2003–2004. NSAID indicates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

Table 4

Medical Management during Patient Visits in which Low Back Pain was the Primary Reason for Seeking Care, 2003–2004 (n = 1,042)*

     

Chronicity

  
 

LBP Visits

Acute Problem

(Initial Visit)

Chronic Problem

(Follow-Up Visit)

Chronic Problem Visits

Medical Management

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

n

NPE

SE

%

OR

95% CI

Diagnostic tests

              

   Complete blood count

52

2,663

416

6

12

525

197

5

19

1,165

265

6

1.32

0.52-3.37

   Urinalysis

69

3,243

456

8

39

1,754

359

16

10

613

161

3

0.18

0.09-0.37

   Radiograph

142

5,602

634

13

57

2,385

406

21

24

830

195

4

0.17

0.09-0.32

   Other imaging test†

83

2,434

345

6

24

632

146

6

29

904

191

5

0.83

0.44-1.58

   Any diagnostic test

926

37,683

2,608

89

244

10,807

809

97

396

15,734

1,419

83

0.14

0.04-0.49

Patient counseling

              

   Diet or nutrition

75

3,335

602

8

15

734

196

7

40

1,688

488

9

1.38

0.58-3.32

   Weight reduction

49

2,232

529

5

10

504

183

5

25

1,143

384

6

1.35

0.52-3.49

   Exercise

204

8,320

1,070

20

49

2,196

391

20

95

3,979

771

21

1.08

0.63-1.85

   Mental health counseling‡

45

1,859

639

4

5

240

124

2

31

1,176

525

6

3.00

0.94-9.61

   Any patient counseling

513

22,397

2,510

53

119

5,408

563

49

224

10,138

1,956

54

1.21

0.70-2.11

Drugs

              

   Non-narcotic analgesics

58

2,492

431

6

13

669

201

6

29

1,351

301

7

1.20

0.51-2.82

   Narcotic analgesics

261

10,503

1,128

25

56

2,385

444

21

141

5,355

758

28

1.44

0.76-2.72

   NSAIDs (including antiarthritics)

333

14,237

1,180

34

113

5,497

596

49

128

5,288

667

28

0.40

0.25-0.64

   Any drug

729

30,523

2,012

72

204

9,746

798

88

316

12,703

1,233

67

0.29

0.13-0.62

Physiotherapy§

179

8,596

2,135

20

32

1,408

325

13

88

4,866

1,887

26

2.38

0.93-6.07

Surgical procedure

59

1,932

407

5

2

51

35

0

27

1,042

304

6

12.62

3.18-50.07

Total

1,042

42,427

3,108

100

253

11,111

798

100

457

18,948

2,154

100

 

...

Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; LBP, low back pain; NPE, national population estimate for the two-year interval; NSAID, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; OR, odds ratio; SE, standard error of the national population estimate.

*Table entries for NPE and SE are in thousands; percentages are based on NPE. NPEs may not be reliable for variables other than any diagnostic test, any patient counseling, any drug, exercise counseling, NSAIDs, and narcotic analgesics because n<30 and/or SE>30% of NPE.

†Excluding mammograms.

‡Including mental health counseling, stress management, or psychotherapy.

§Including spinal manipulation.

Several other factors emerged in association with the common elements of primary LBP medical management after controlling for potential confounders (Table 5). Patient counseling was less often provided for non-Whites (P = .04) and in geographic regions outside the Northeast (P = .01), although it was provided more often when injuries were reported (P < .001). Specifically, with regard to exercise counseling, there remained a geographic variation (P = .003) and propensity for use following injury (P < .001). However, exercise counseling was less often provided in non-MSAs (P = .04) and by various physician specialties (P < .001), including family (general) medicine physicians and internal medicine physicians.
Table 5

Factors Associated with Medical Management during Patient Visits in which Low Back Pain was the Primary Reason for Seeking Care, 2003–2004 (n = 710)*

 

Medical Management

 

Exercise Counseling

Any Patient Counseling

Narcotic Analgesic

NSAID

Any Drug

Characteristic

OR†

95% CI

OR†

95% CI

OR†

95% CI

OR†

95% CI

OR†

95% CI

Patient age, y

          

<25

0.53

0.15 – 1.90

0.64

0.27 – 1.53

0.35

0.11 – 1.11

0.93

0.44·1.94

0.19

0.08 – 0.50

25–44

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

45–64

1.20

0.66 – 2.19

1.08

0.66 – 1.75

0.80

0.47 – 1.36

0.64

0.39·1.06

0.63

0.36 – 1.09

≥65

0.93

0.47 – 1.83

0.67

0.38 – 1.19

0.42

0.21 – 0.84

0.73

0.44·1.20

0.77

0.38 – 1.56

Patient sex

          

Female

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Male

0.85

0.52 – 1.38

0.91

0.62 – 1.36

0.90

0.59 – 1.39

0.99

0.68·1.45

0.76

0.50 – 1.14

Patient race

          

White

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-White

0.66

0.23 – 1.89

0.49

0.25 – 0.96

0.91

0.42 – 2.01

1.30

0.60·2.84

3.54

1.40 – 8.97

Patient ethnicity

          

Non-Hispanic

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Hispanic

1.45

0.77 – 2.77

1.45

0.77 – 2.77

0.30

0.11 – 0.76

1.12

0.53·2.36

1.78

0.73 – 4.36

Geographic region

          

Northeast

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Midwest

0.33

0.14 – 0.78

0.29

0.14 – 0.60

1.18

0.43 – 3.24

2.05

0.93 – 4.49

2.00

0.67 – 5.97

South

0.27

0.13 – 0.56

0.36

0.17 – 0.74

1.16

0.50 – 2.72

1.81

0.84 – 3.90

2.23

0.98 – 5.08

West

0.59

0.26 – 1.34

0.45

0.22 – 0.93

1.56

0.63 – 3.84

1.45

0.67 – 3.14

1.85

0.75 – 4.56

MSA status

          

MSA

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Non-MSA

0.45

0.21 – 0.96

0.77

0.38 – 1.53

1.96

1.06 – 3.63

0.90

0.40 – 2.07

2.90

0.64 – 13.08

Chronicity

          

Acute (initial visit)

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Chronic (follow-up visit)

0.87

0.48 – 1.59

1.16

0.72 – 1.87

1.54

0.87 – 2.75

0.56

0.37 – 0.86

0.35

0.19 – 0.64

IPA etiology

          

No

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

2.34

1.49 – 3.68

2.38

1.50 – 3.77

0.74

0.44 – 1.27

1.19

0.83 – 1.73

0.62

0.36 – 1.08

PCP status

          

Non-PCP or unknown

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

PCP

1.59

0.67 – 3.76

1.10

0.56 – 2.17

1.38

0.72 – 2.67

1.62

1.05 – 2.49

1.98

1.19 – 3.28

Type of physician

          

Doctor of Medicine

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Doctor of Osteopathy

1.53

0.80 – 2.92

1.02

0.46 – 2.26

0.70

0.31 – 1.58

0.43

0.24 – 0.76

0.44

0.18 – 1.11

Physician specialty

          

Family (general) medicine

0.30

0.12 – 0.74

0.71

0.32 – 1.59

0.99

0.46 – 2.12

1.52

0.79 – 2.92

2.38

1.06 – 5.35

Internal medicine

0.15

0.05 – 0.40

0.42

0.13 – 1.32

0.63

0.25 – 1.62

0.68

0.28 – 1.69

0.73

0.28 – 1.87

Neurology

0.24

0.06 – 0.94

0.50

0.18 – 1.39

0.88

0.38 – 2.05

0.94

0.43 – 2.04

0.86

0.38 – 1.98

Orthopedics

1.55

0.59 – 4.05

1.01

0.40 – 2.55

0.81

0.33 – 2.00

0.97

0.39 – 2.40

0.45

0.16 – 1.31

All other specialties

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Shared physician care

          

No or unknown

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

1.00

...

Yes

1.13

0.62 – 2.08

1.08

0.62 – 1.87

1.61

0.95 – 2.76

1.28

0.70 – 2.36

1.02

0.60 – 1.75

Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; IPA, injury, poisoning, or adverse effect of medical treatment; MSA, metropolitan statistical area; NSAID, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; OR, odds ratio; PCP, primary care physician.

*Only initial visits for acute problems or follow-up visits for chronic problems were included.

†Adjusted for all variables shown.

There was an association between age and drugs ordered (P = .01) during primary LBP patient visits (Table 5). Drugs were ordered less often in the young (<25 years) than in the referent age category (25–44 years). Drugs were ordered more often among non-Whites (P = .01) and by primary care physicians (P = .01), particularly family (general) medicine physicians. Similarly, primary care physicians were more likely to order NSAIDs (P = .03), although osteopathic physicians were less likely to order NSAIDs than allopathic physicians (P = .004). There was an association between age and narcotic analgesic use (P = .05), with less use in older patients (>65 years) compared with the referent age category (25–44 years). Narcotic analgesics were prescribed less often in Hispanics (P = .01) and more often in non-MSAs (P = .03).

Conclusion

This study helps shed more light on LBP that motivates patients to seek medical care. More than 40% of LBP patient visits were provided by family (general) medicine physicians, comprising one of every 17 patient visits for this specialty. However, orthopedic surgeons provided a slightly greater percentage of LBP visits as part of their specialty case mix (1 of every 16 patient visits). Further, a substantial percentage of LBP patient visits (45%) were provided by non-primary care physicians. During 2003–2004 there were more than twice as many patient visits annually for LBP than reported in the 1990 NAMCS; however, the percentage of patient visits attributed to LBP (3%) and the percentage of LBP patient visits provided by primary care physicians (55%) remained remarkably similar to what was reported in the 1980s and early 1990s [20]. Non-primary care services generally are considered inappropriate for patients with non-specific LBP [10]. Thus, this study suggests that the recommended shift to primary care physicians for medical management of non-specific LBP has not occurred over the past two decades.

Injuries were the strongest risk factor associated with LBP patient visits (OR, 3.38; 95%, 2.75–4.14). There were also characteristic patterns of LBP patient visits according to age and geographic region. Patients other than those 25–44 years of age were less likely to seek medical care for LBP. Unavailable, and therefore uncontrolled, variables that could potentially explain the observed age distribution of LBP patient visits include occupational risk factors such as manual handling of materials, bending and twisting, whole-body vibration, and lifting for more than three-fourths of the work day [21]. Patient visits for LBP were less likely to occur in the Midwest and South than in the Northeast (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.40–0.77 for each contrast). It is unclear if these geographic findings reflect the epidemiology of LBP in the United States or if they are confounded by other uncontrolled variables. While relatively little is known about risk factors in the transition from acute to chronic LBP, this study suggests that injuries are not associated with progression of LBP.

Osteopathic physicians were more likely than allopathic physicians to provide medical care during LBP patient visits (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.75–3.92). The physician specialties most likely to provide LBP patient visits were family (general) medicine, internal medicine, neurology, and orthopedic surgery. These findings are consistent with previous studies [10, 22]. There was an even stronger association between osteopathic physicians and chronic LBP patient visits (OR, 4.39; 95% CI, 2.47–7.80). However, physician specialists in family (general) medicine, internal medicine, and neurology were not more likely than other physician specialists to provide chronic LBP patient visits. These findings, coupled with the greater use of shared physician care in chronic LBP (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.30–3.44), suggest that osteopathic physicians are often used to complement the conventional medical management of chronic LBP by providing spinal manipulation.

At least eleven national clinical guidelines for LBP medical management in the primary care setting were published between 1994 and 2000 [23]. An updated review of national clinical guidelines summarized recommendations according to LBP chronicity [24]. For acute LBP, radiographs were not considered useful for diagnosis of non-specific LBP. Recommended treatments included advising patients to remain active (although back-specific exercises were not considered effective), and ordering paracetamol or NSAIDs (muscle relaxants or narcotic analgesics may be considered as well). In contrast to acute LBP, few guidelines existed for the medical management of chronic LBP. Recently, however, European guidelines have been established for the management of chronic non-specific LBP [25]. These guidelines do not recommend radiographs or other diagnostic imaging tests unless a specific cause is strongly suspected. They recommend brief educational interventions (specifically including supervised exercise therapy), cognitive behavioral therapy, and short-term use of NSAIDs or weak narcotic analgesics for pain relief. They generally do not recommend physical therapies (although spinal manipulation may be considered) or surgery (unless all other recommended conservative treatments have been tried and failed over a period of at least two years).

This study suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy (as proxied by mental health counseling) may be under-utilized in the medical management of chronic LBP (6% of patient visits), which is often characterized by depression and somatization [26]. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were the most commonly used drugs for acute LBP (49% of patient visits); however, they were less likely to be used for chronic LBP (28% of patient visits). Non-narcotic analgesics were infrequently used for either acute or chronic LBP (6% of patient visits overall). The reported percentage of chronic back patients prescribed narcotic analgesics varies widely, from 3% to 66%, based on the treatment setting [27]. The present study found the relevant percentage to be 28%. Almost two million surgical procedures (about one million annually) were ordered, scheduled, or performed during primary LBP patient visits. Not surprisingly, surgical procedures were more frequently associated with chronic LBP patient visits compared with acute LBP patient visits (OR, 12.62; 95% CI, 3.18–50.07). Together, the findings of this study reinforce the caricature of LBP medical care in the United States as being overspecialized, overinvasive, and overexpensive [10].

The medical management of LBP varies substantially between practitioners and countries [24, 28]. Differences were observed in this study with regard to type of physician provider, physician specialty, and geographic region. Osteopathic physicians were less likely than allopathic physicians to order NSAIDs for LBP (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.24–0.76). This is consistent with the theory that osteopathic physicians are less likely to prescribe drugs for LBP because they may use spinal manipulation as an alternative to drugs [29]. Previous studies including an analysis of older NAMCS data [20] and a randomized controlled trial [30] have provided evidence to help support this theory. Family (general) medicine physicians were less likely to provide exercise counseling, but were more likely to order drugs for LBP. Time constraints during patient visits, particularly in a managed care environment, represent a possible explanation for the latter findings [31]. Patient counseling was less often provided outside the Northeast in this study. A strong predictor of patient counseling, including exercise counseling, was having had an injury as the reason for seeking medical care for LBP (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.50–3.77).

Although this study involved a large, nationally representative sample of patient visits for ambulatory medical care in the United States, there are several limitations of this study that should be noted. The study involved the epidemiology and medical management of LBP that was of a magnitude sufficient to prompt patients to visit physician offices for ambulatory medical care. Further, the study was limited by the NAMCS patient record form to patient visits in which LBP was among the three most important reasons for seeking medical care. Thus, this may more properly be considered a study of the epidemiology and medical management of clinically significant LBP in the ambulatory medical care environment. Although the measurement of incidence or prevalence rates was not an objective of the study, all patient visits in which LBP was recorded as a reason for seeking medical care were included in the epidemiological analyses to capture the maximal number of incident or prevalent LBP cases and thereby to provide more precise statistical estimates. Nevertheless, similar results were observed in the epidemiological analyses when only primary LBP patient visits were included (Table 1). The medical management analyses, however, were limited to only primary LBP patient visits to avoid potential confounding by other more important reasons for seeking medical care.

Simplifying assumptions were made in certain analyses because of limitations inherent in the NAMCS patient record form. Patient visits attributed to back (RFV code 1905) and low back (RFV code 1910) symptoms were combined because there were no substantive differences in the characteristics associated with these reported reasons for seeking medical care (Table 1). All patient visits attributed to back symptoms were assumed to involve back pain, although 4% of such visits involved unspecified back symptoms and another 2% involved such other back symptoms as cramps, contractures, spasms, limitation of movement or stiffness, or weakness. Similarly, with regard to etiology, all of the 19.7 million patient visits in which an IPA was reported (using a dichotomous patient record form item) were assumed to involve an injury, although in the subset of 8.4 million patient visits in which the specific IPA was described, up to 11% may have involved iatrogenic, environmental, or other etiologies. The elements of LBP medical management were assessed with survey items that asked whether the relevant element was "ordered, scheduled, or performed." However, it was impossible to confirm whether the reported elements actually occurred within the relevant patient visit or were eventually performed by the reporting physician.

Several analyses yielded imprecise results because they were based on less than 30 NAMCS patient visits or because the SE was greater than 30% of the NPE. Most often this occurred with less common characteristics (internal medicine physicians) or elements of LBP medical management (weight reduction and mental health counseling, physiotherapy, and surgical procedures), or in stratified (subgroup) analyses. Thus, racial minority groups were combined in a "non-White" group to partially overcome this limitation. Hospital admission could not be studied as an element of LBP medical management because of the limited number of observations.

In conclusion, this study found that the percentage of LBP visits provided by primary care physicians in the United States remains suboptimal. Medical management of LBP, particularly chronic LBP, appears to over-utilize surgery relative to more conservative measures such as patient counseling, non-narcotic analgesics, and other drug therapies. Osteopathic physicians are more likely to provide LBP care, and less likely to use NSAIDs during such visits, than their allopathic counterparts. In general, LBP medical management does not appear to be in accord with evidence-based guidelines.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health – National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (grant number K24AT002422) and the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation. Neither the National Institutes of Health nor the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation participated in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or in the participation, review, or approval of the manuscript. The author reports no financial conflicts of interest.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
The Osteopathic Research Center, University of North Texas Health Science Center

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Copyright

© Licciardone; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2008

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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